London Twestival Sells Out... Twits, Texts and Tequila

Twestival Logo

amiando - LONDON TWESTIVAL - London - Shoreditch Studios - @twestival.

So this week the first 500 tickets for the second London Twestival went on sale, and you guessed it Sold Out. (Kind of give away in the title of the post I Know but come on, you wouldn't be reading otherwise).

Twestival London is described thus:

On 12 February 2009 100+ cities around the world will be hosting Twestivals which bring together Twitter communities for an evening of fun and to raise money and awareness for charity: water.

Join us by hosting a Twestival in your city, attending an event, or participating online.

The Twestival is organized 100% by volunteers in cities around the world and 100% of the money rais

ed from these events will go directly to supportcharity: water projects.

In September 2008, a group of Twitterers based in London UK decided to organise an event where the local Twitter community could socialize offline; meet the faces behind the avatars, enjoy some entertainment, have a few drinks and tie this in with a food drive and fundraising effort for a local homeless charity.

The bulk of the event was organized in under two weeks, via Twitter and utilized the talents and financial support of the local Twittersphere to make this happen.

Around the world similar stories started appearing of local Twitter communities coming together and taking action for a great cause. Twestival was born out of the idea that if cities were able to collaborate on an international scale, but working from a local level, it could have a spectacular impact.

By rallying together globally, under short timescales, for a single aim on the same day, the Twestival hopes to bring awareness to this global crisis.

Great stuff... All well and good. People who like a thing, get together and chat about that thing and raise some money for a great charity along the way.

However... (and please don't come down too hard on me for this because, I personally don't have a problem with it) Why would an online community, one that is largely made up of lots of people connected purely via the internet (at least is my @jamespoulter follow list is anything to go by) want to meet up offline and discuss... what? Exactly. Of course, a networking opportunity. Or a dating chance, or just an option for twitterholics to get out of the house. Either way. Just still seems all a little odd that the unknown little app of a year ago, a truely niché product-come-mainstream is bringing people truely together. I leave that debate to you.

As a way of closing, let me also direct your attention to the ticket facility that twestival are using - namely - amiando .

 

A great online ticket management/event management tool, allowing you to set up an event, sell tickets, post your purchase to Facebook using FacebookConnect. Great tool, easy to use.  So well done. Let me know if you are going. If they release more slots, then I'll see you there, work out what all the fuss is about...

Barnardos Childrens Online Ads - Break the Cycle

http://tinyurl.com/56yeu3 Check out the above link to learn about the new Barbardos Campaign

teenage girl being hit in the head while eating at home

In an interesting use of video and interactivity, this new campaign from Bernardos invites users to "Break The Cycle" of abuse being shown on screen by clicking the stop button on the video, which launches into a full screen, high quality movie when clicked.

Enticing, brutal and provocative, the new campaign seeks to help children be brought out of cycles of antisocial behaviour, drug abuse and poverty.

Some Facts: (Source, YouGov.)

Research conducted by YouGov shows that:

  • just under half (49%) of people believe that children are increasingly a danger to each other and adults
  • 43% agree something has to be done to protect us from children
  • 45% think that children are feral in the way they behave.

A survey conducted amongst Barnardo’s young people – just over half of whom have been in trouble – found that most of them thought that young people get into trouble because of boredom and peer pressure.  

Of the 393 youngsters, aged between 10 and 23:

  • 44% said bad behaviour is encouraged when the media portrays their peers as misbehaving
  • 84% said young people get into trouble because of boredom
  • 88% said having more things to do and places to go might stop young people getting into trouble
  • 32% would go to friends for help if they were in trouble.

Shocking stuff really, as is the campaign videos, but well worth a look. From a media sense, this is doing nothing news, but is using something we have already seen in various incarnations, to great effect...

JP 2008